{INTRODUCTION} {MAJOR KOTO SCHOOLS} {DIAGRAMS AND TERMINOLOGY} {GLOSSARY}{ARTICLES}


 

SHODAI KANENAGA

 

YAMATO TEGAI SCHOOL

 

The first generation Kanenaga is known to be the founder of the Yamato Tegai school of sword making. This school got its name from the fact that its workshop was built in front of the gate Tengai-mon belonging to the Todaiji Temple in Nara. It was founded by Kanenaga who worked around 1288-1293. The smiths of this school all used the same character. "Kane" in their works. Some of the other smiths were Kanekiyo, Kanetsugu, Kanetoshi, and Kanemitsu. Some of the later smiths such as Kaneuji moved to Mino and changed the character "Kane" to the one we are familiar with for all succeeding Mino smiths.

 

Of the smiths of this school, the first generation Kanenaga left a fair number of signed examples of his work. Most have been greatly shortened with the two characters of his name being found at the very bottom of the nakago. There are only two known examples of intact nakago surviving and, unfortunately, one of them has been re-tempered. The works of the first generation Kanenaga are known to be the best that the school produced.

 

SUGATA: The shape of Kanenaga's works are what we have come to know as typical Yamato. They are shinogi-zukuri and irori mune. The shinogi is high with a wide shinogi-haba. There is a marked curvature with koshi-zori and occasionally some saki-zori. The point is chu-kissaki.

 

HAMON: While the temper lines of Kanenaga's work tend to be suguba based, there is often a slight ko-notare and ko-gunome aspect to be found. One of the traits of his blades is that often there are significant differences in the shape of the hamon from one side to the other. All will have extremely bright nie present in abundant quantities. Occasionally there is ara ji-nie present also. Present in the hamon you will find hotsure, uchinoke, yubashira and other grain activities.

 

BOSHI: Strong nie and yakizume are the most common. Some have kaeri and are completely hakkake. The kaeri when present is short.

 

HADA: The kitae is mmasame are the most common. Kanenaga is generally known for the crisp and clear nature of his jigane. The pronounced display of nie grains in the ji are another characteristic of this smith.

 

NAKAGO: While, as has been noted, most of the surviving works are o-suriage with the original nakago lost, the couple of surviving ubu examples show a kuirjiri tip, round mune, and the yasurime done in takanoha (hawk feathers).

 

MEI: His signature is done in large kanji and in ni-ji style:

 

KANENAGA

 

{INTRODUCTION} {MAJOR KOTO SCHOOLS} {DIAGRAMS AND TERMINOLOGY} {GLOSSARY}{ARTICLES}





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